School Thy Feelings

My grandpa, uncle, dad, and I starting sing in a quartet together over a year ago. It's a lot of fun. We're not terribly professional, but we've got some dozen songs that we've got down pretty well. We've got a couple westerns, some old love songs, some hymns from the hymnbook, and some other traditional spirituals. A lot of our songs are19th century or early 20th century era. One of our most recent additions has been Lida Rose. Sometimes it is kind of a stretch for us to cover all the parts. When we decided to start we all had essential the same range, except my range was a couple notes higher than everyone else: we had three baritones, and one second tenor. So to make it work, I always sing first tenor and the other three trade around depending on the song so that no one gets stuck with the really high second tenor all the time. It's been working out pretty well, actually. While certainly not my favorite that we sing overall, of the songs that we sing from the hymnbook my favorite is a pretty uncommon song. It was originally simply written as a poem and was set to music sometime later:
School Thy Feelings Charles W. Penrose School thy feelings, O my brother; Train thy warm, impulsive soul. Do not its emotions smother, But let wisdom's voice control. School thy feelings; there is power In the cool, collected mind. Passion shatters reason's tower, Makes the clearest vision blind. School thy feelings; condemnation Never pass on friend or foe, Though the tide of accusation Like a flood of truth may flow. Hear defense before deciding, And a ray of light may gleam, Showing thee what filth is hiding Underneath the shallow stream. Should affliction's acrid vial Burst o'er thy unsheltered head, School thy feelings to the trial; Half its bitterness hath fled. Art thou falsely, basely, slandered? Does the world begin to frown? Gauge thy wrath by wisdom's standard; Keep thy rising anger down. Rest thyself on this assurance: Time's a friend to innocence, And the patient, calm endurance Wins respect and aids defense. Noblest minds have finest feelings; Quiv'ring strings a breath can move; And the gospel's sweet revealings Tune them with the key of love. Hearts so sensitively molded Strongly fortified should be, Trained to firmness and enfolded In a calm tranquility. Wound not willfully another; Conquer haste with reason's might; School thy feelings, sister, brother; Train them in the path of right. School thy feelings, O my brother; Train thy warm, impulsive soul. Do not its emotions smother, But let wisdom's voice control.